fbpx
Connect with us

Podcasts

REMASTERED Episode 128: The Belinda Temple Case, Part 2

Published

on

www.youtube.com – – 2023-09-02 09:10:25

SUMMARY: David Temple, a Houston coach, was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife Belinda in 1999. However, due to prosecutorial misconduct and withheld evidence, he was granted a new trial in 2016. In the second trial, he was found guilty again. The defense argued that Joe Sanders, a teenager, was the real suspect, but there was no evidence to support this claim. The sentencing phase resulted in a mistrial, and David's request for a third trial was denied. He is currently awaiting sentencing while his attorneys argue for a new jury to determine his fate.

After the brutal murder of Belinda Temple, an 8 month pregnant school teacher in 1999, the Harris County DA's office took five years to finally charge her husband, David, with murder. They had an ace in the hole. They had star prosecutor Kelley Siegler. But David Temple's family hired Dick DeGuerin, the guy who got Robert Durst off after he dismembered his landlord. The trial had the promised fireworks but afterwards, Kelly Siegler was accused of prosecutorial misconduct. So David Temple went to trial for a second time, 20 years after his wife was murdered. Will Belinda Temple and her unborn daughter ever get justice? Part 2 of 2.

Hosted and produced by Erica Kelley

Researched and written by Erica Kelley

Original Graphic Art by Coley Horner

Original Music by Rob Harrison of Gamma Radio

https://southernfriedtruecrime.com
https://www.facebook.com/southernfrie
https://www.patreon.com/southernfried
https://whatamaneuver.net/collections… (merch shop)
@southfriedtruth and @kericak (Twitter) | @southernfriedtruecrime (Insta)

Source

Please follow and like us:
Pin Share

Podcasts

José Andrés on the Healing Power of Food | Biscuits & Jam | Season 5 | Episode 1

Published

on

www.youtube.com – – 2024-02-20 11:00:36

SUMMARY: In this episode of “Biscuits and Jam” hosted by Sid Evans, Jose Andres, a renowned chef and founder of World Central Kitchen, discusses his love for food, his culinary journey, and the work of his organization. They talk about the recently released World Central Kitchen cookbook and the significance of hospitality. Jose shares stories of his experiences in various disaster-stricken areas where he fed survivors and the importance of taking risks to create positive change. He also touches on the power of food to bring people together and foster empathy. The episode concludes with a discussion on the dangers of his work and his new graphic novel, “Feeding Dangerously.”

José Andrés was born and raised in Spain and has brought his love of Spanish cuisine to successful restaurants in New York City and Washington DC. While he now has dozens of dining establishments in a host of different cities, what really sets him apart is the work he's done with World Central Kitchen. Founded in 2010 in response to the devastating earthquake that hit Haiti, World Central Kitchen has gone on to feed survivors of hurricanes, tornadoes, and fires all around the world, as well as countless people traumatized by war.
In this episode, José talks to Sid about the many kitchens of his childhood, how cooking for those in peril is both an act of relief and a chance to learn, and how longer tables are perhaps the closest thing to a perfect place on Earth.

#southernliving #podcast #washingtondc #spanish #newyorkcity #food

Want to see more Southern Living videos? Subscribe to our channel! – http://goo.gl/JJ5WqY

Barbecue has always been the vehicle for a social gathering in the South. Watch Robby Melvin, Southern Living's Test Kitchen Director, chat with iconic Southerners while making a range of BBQ dishes.

Traditional does not mean stuffy in the home of Southern Living test kitchen pro Ivy Odom. This Georgia-bred millennial can fish, throw a mean SEC tailgate, and even knows her way around a pigsty. In each episode, Ivy shares stories, customs, and recipes from growing up in the Deep South but always adds her own modern spin.

From hot takes on the South's most intriguing real estate listings to hunting for treasures at estate sales and touring the region's most spectacular homes, Southern Living style editor Betsy Cribb is up for it all. Home-obsessed Betsy keeps it real whether she's doling out opinions on Tyler Perry's Atlanta mansion or exploring Southern estates.

In 1966, Southern Living was created to highlight the beauty and culture of the growing South. In the decades since its inception, Southern Living, published monthly, has become one of the largest lifestyle magazines in the country. With characteristic Southern hospitality, Southern Living is committed to sharing the region we love with our readers, no matter where they may live.

Source

Please follow and like us:
Pin Share
Continue Reading

Podcasts

Writer Eva Menasse: A Force Bigger Than Me | Louisiana Channel

Published

on

www.youtube.com – – 2024-02-20 09:15:02

SUMMARY: This content discusses various aspects, including the themes of surveillance and human behavior, the significance of historical research in writing fiction, the author's use of dark wit in their writing, the importance of literature in interpreting human actions, the author's personal background and their approach to speaking out, concerns about the erosion of democratic values due to ideological extremism and technology, the dangers of digitalization and social media, the limitations of clear differentiation and the need for forgiveness and generosity in society, the role of art and the current challenges it faces in terms of censorship and moralization.

“Literature is forever. It's eternal.”

German author and journalist Eva Menasse about her acclaimed novel Darkenbloom, the need to speak up publicly and defend democracy against old and new enemies.

“Journalism or history has to stick with the facts and cannot interpret people's actions. This is what only literature or art can do. They bring these characters alive. This is what triggers me when I write fiction.”

The novel Darkenbloom circles around two historical events – the fall of the Iron Curtain in the fall of 1989 and a war crime in the Austrian town Rechnitz, close to the Austrian-Hungarian border, taking place at the end of the Second World War.

“I was a very shy person, but I think I was always determined, and this sense of outspokenness that people link up with me is just; it has some family roots. My father was a refugee as a child, and he had to emigrate to the United Kingdom at the age of eight years, where he was not allowed to speak German on the streets because, during war times, it was dangerous. When he returned, he rather did not talk about his past as a refugee child because, in these years right after the war, everybody wanted you to forget the past. So, he did not make a fuss about his particular life story. My brother and I were completely the opposite. We used to speak out as soon as we were able to publish, as soon as we were accepted as writers. I think we are making up at some point for what happened to our father.”

To Eva Menasse, it is essential to engage in social and political discussions beyond the realm of literature.

“When I'm participating in discussions, I always speak out as a citizen and part of our democracy. I really think that we are living in dangerous times, not only because of climate change but also because technology might be eating us up.”

“It is an interesting question if art can help understand these developments because art itself has become the goal of discussion. There's a lot: ‘Is this allowed or should this be prohibited in the arts? Should we cover up naked women?' These questions were discussed by the feminists in the 70s. And in the 70s, they said: ‘No, we should not cover up naked women. We should also show naked men.' Nowadays, it's the other way around. And this is frightening.”

Eva Menasse (b. 1970 in Vienna) is an Austrian author and journalist. She has studied history and German literature and is the sister of the known writer Robert Menasse. Menasse had a successful career as a journalist, writing for the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung in Frankfurt and as a correspondent from Prague and Berlin. She left the paper to write her first novel, Vienna, which was shortlisted for the 2007 Independent Foreign Fiction Prize in the UK. Her acclaimed novel Darkenbloom will be published in the UK in the autumn of 2024. In November 2023, she published an essay on digitalisation, social media and the state of the public debate Alles und nichts sagen. Vom Zustand der Debatte in der Digitalmoderne.

Eva Menasse has received numerous awards: The Gerty Spies Prize for Literature, the Heinrich Böll Prize, the Friedrich Hölderlin Prize, the Jonathan Swift Prize, the Austrian Book Prize, the Bruno Kreisky Prize, and the Jakob Wassermann Literature prize. She was also a writer-in-residence in Mainz and a fellow at the Villa Massimo in Rome. Eva Menasse is also increasingly active as an essayist, for which she received the Ludwig Börne Prize in 2019. She lives in Berlin and is a founding member and, together with Deniz Yücel, spokesperson for PEN Berlin, launched in 2022.

Eva Menasse was interviewed by Marc-Christoph Wagner in August 2023. took place during the festival Louisiana Literature at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art.

Camera: Simon Weyhe
Edited by: Roxanne Bagheshirin Lærkesen
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2024

Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling and Fritz Hansen.

#literature #writing

Subscribe to our channel for more on literature: https://www.youtube.com/thelouisianachannel

FOLLOW US HERE!
Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/LouisianaChann

Source

Please follow and like us:
Pin Share
Continue Reading

Podcasts

Marina Abramović & Ulay: On Performance and Reperformance | Louisiana Channel

Published

on

www.youtube.com – – 2024-02-15 09:27:11

SUMMARY: The content discusses the concept of legacy in the context of performance art. The speaker believes that their own legacy in performance art may not have been created yet, and that it is ultimately determined by others. They emphasize the importance of reperformance and training young performers to create transformative experiences for the audience. The speaker also discusses the limitations of other art forms, such as photography and , compared to the living form of art that is performance. They express their initial rejection of reperformance but later recognize its acceptance in the art world. The speaker promotes the idea of integrating the audience into the performance and creating a supportive community around it.

”Performance art is a living form of art.” – Marina Abramović

After 30 years, the legendary performance artists Marina Abramović and the late Ulay agreed to come together, for the first time on camera, for a raw, honest, and unfiltered conversation about their art, life, and legacy. Among the things they discuss are the resurrection of performance art and the concept of re-performing past pieces.

Marina Abramović and Ulay reflect on the practical aspects and challenges of re-performing their iconic works, shedding light on the evolving landscape of performance art.

When confronted with the question of who could effectively re-perform their pieces, Ulay initially rejected the idea of re-performing his pieces. He recalls: “At one stage, you called me, and you said, ‘Listen, I want to re-perform three or four of our former pieces, which can be you?' Do you remember what I said? 'Me, I would have done it. I would have done it without restrictions or regret.' And then you said, 'No, no, no, no.'”

Despite Ulay's reservations, Marina Abramović and Ulay's performance pieces have been re-performed in several institutions, including MoMA in New York and Louisiana Museum in Denmark.

Reflecting on the live-ness as the core of performance art, Marina Abramović makes a statement about how the performer heavily influences the piece:

“Re -performance is like performing a good Bach: you can have a lousy guy who performs a Bach that is so terrible, you just want to sleep, or you can have an amazing charismatic performer who gives you something new because he's giving his own input into this work. It's the same with young performers. They have to be trained, they have to be handled well, and when they really perform, if they have this charisma, it's a transformative experience.”

The video is an excerpt from the Louisiana Channel documentary ‘No Predicted End': https://youtu.be/9OnmjKWPEjQ

Ulay (Frank Uwe Laysiepen, b.1943 – d.2020) was a German artist, who was based in Amsterdam, Holland, and Ljubljana, Slovenia. Ulay received international recognition for his work as a photographer, mainly in Polaroid, from the late 1960s, and later as a performance artist, including his collaborative performances with Marina Abramović from 1976 to 1988. His work has continuously dealt with politics, identity, and gender. In 2016 Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Germany, held the first major retrospective show of his work ‘Ulay Life-Sized.' In 2020 the Stedelijk Museum held the largest-ever, and first international post-humous, retrospective exhibition of his work ‘Ulay Was Here.' Marina

Abramović (b. 1946) was born in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia, and is now based in New York. She began her work as a performance artist in the early 1970s and is now regarded as one of the most important artists in the field. Her work explores the relationship between the performer and audience, the limits of the body, and the possibilities of the mind. Her retrospective ‘The Artist is Present' at MoMA, New York, in 2010 gave her a wide international breakthrough. In 2017 the retrospective exhibition ‘The Cleaner' was shown at Moderna Museet in Stockholm and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebæk, Denmark, among other places in Europe. Marina Abramović is set to have a major exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, the first-ever UK exhibition spanning her life's work.

Marina Abramović and Ulay were interviewed by Kasper Bech Dyg in upstate New York at Marina Abramović's home over ten days in August 2018 for the film ‘No Predicted End.'

Directed, edited, and produced by Kasper Bech Dyg
Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Additional Camera: Kasper Bech Dyg
Music: Simon Dokkedal Sound
Mix: Torsten Larsen
Colour Grading: Klaus Elmer
Graphic Design: Louisiana Design Studio

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2022 Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling and Fritz Hansen.

#MarinaAbramović #Ulay #performanceart

Subscribe to our channel for more on art: https://www.youtube.com/thelouisianachannel

FOLLOW US HERE!
Website: http://channel.louisiana.dk
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LouisianaChannel
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/louisianachannel

Source

Please follow and like us:
Pin Share
Continue Reading

News from the South

Trending