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Photographer Jacob Aue Sobol: “My work is about what we have in common.” | Louisiana Channel

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www.youtube.com – – 2023-08-29 08:30:15

SUMMARY: The content describes the experiences of Jacob, who identifies as a photographer, artist, father, husband, and fisherman. He believes that being an artist is a way of life and values imagination and freedom. Jacob's photography is not limited to specific locations or subjects, but is a way of capturing moments from his own life. He believes in connecting with people and places to create intimacy and share experiences. His work is about highlighting the commonalities of human experiences and emotions across different cultures. Jacob's time in Greenland and Guatemala had a significant impact on him and influenced his photography. He values quietness and introspection and believes that introverts often create the strongest images. Humility is also important to him.

“I'm always seeking the intimate moments with another person”. With his raw and expressive black-and-white approach, Jacob Aue Sobol is able to get up close to the people he depicts. His photographs are deeply immersive and explore themes of vulnerability, intimacy and connectedness.

“I walk up to people, look them in the eyes and tell them, I think you look interesting. I would like to share something with you, and I would like to make a portrait of you. Some people react by running away, and some people do the opposite; they move closer. They keep looking you in the eyes.”

We met the danish Magnum photographer and visual artist Jacob Aue Sobol in his home on Fejø, a small island in the southern part of Zealand, Denmark. From here, he photographs, makes exhibitions, spends time with his family and fish. He is very enthusiastic about his fishing. “I don't fish to get away from home or for social reasons. I fish because I can bring home food. It's definitely my years in Greeland that has given me this need of bringing home food.”

Jacob Aue Sobol explains that he is always alone when he fishes. Only then are you able to get closer to the nature surrounding you, but also the nature within, your inner life and emotions. He started to go fishing when he was in Greenland, where he lived for three years. It was also here that his visual output began to develop. “It was in the wintertime, and it was very dark, so I started to use a flashlight there. Part of my style and visual output started in Greenland from using this flash, which also created more contrast in the pictures.”

With a distinct and captivating style, Jacob Aue Sobol seeks to connect us as humans. This is also one of the reasons he uses black and white photography because it creates a more direct path into the viewer's inner emotions. His work is a reminder that photography is a powerful tool for empathy. His pictures become a window into the hearts and souls of those he photographs. “My work is about what we have in common. Why we are the same. It's about connecting us as humans”

Jacob Aue Sobol was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1976. A photographer and member of Magnum Photos, he has published several monographs of his unique, expressive style of black-and-white photography and exhibited his work widely. His images focus on the universality of human emotion and the search for love within oftentimes harsh surroundings. Aue Sobol lived in Canada from 1994-95 and in Greenland from 2000-2002. In Spring 2006, he moved to Tokyo for 18 months before returning to Denmark in August 2008. He has travelled extensively in the years since, photographing in Siberia, Thailand, Mongolia, America, and China while staying based in Copenhagen. After studying at the European Film College in 1998, Jacob was admitted to Fatamorgana, a Danish school for documentary and art photography. In the autumn of 1999, he went to live in the settlement Tiniteqilaaq on the East Coast of Greenland. Over the next three years, he lived mainly in this township with his Greenlandic girlfriend Sabine and her family, living the life of a fisherman and seal hunter but also photographing. The resulting book, “Sabine”, was published in 2004. In the summer of 2005, Jacob travelled with a film crew to Guatemala to make a documentary about a young Mayan girl's first journey to the ocean. The following year he returned by himself to the mountains of Guatemala, where he met the indigenous Gomez-Brito family. He stayed with them for a month to tell the story of their everyday life. The series won first prize in the Daily Life category of World Press Photo in 2006. In 2006 he moved to Tokyo, and during the next two years, he created the images for the book “I, Tokyo,” which was awarded the Leica European Publishers Award in 2008. Following his time in Tokyo, Jacob worked extensively in Bangkok, resulting in the 2016 book “By the River of Kings.” In 2012 he began photographing along the Trans-Siberian Railroad and spent the next five winters photographing in the remote Russian province of Yakutia for his project “Road of Bones.” He has ongoing projects in Denmark (“Home”) and the United States (“America”).

Jacob Aue Sobol was interviewed by Malte Bruun Fals in his home on Fejø, Denmark in May 2023.

Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Producer and editor: Malte Bruun Fals
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2023

Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling, and Fritz Hansen.

#JacobAueSobol #MagnumPhotography #photography

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Artist Thao Nguyen Phan: Learning From Past Lives | Louisiana Channel

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-18 09:30:30

SUMMARY: Thao Nguyen Phan, a Vietnamese visual artist, explores history, trauma, and human connection through her art, which blends poetry and beauty in traumatic contexts to offer optimism and alternative perspectives. Influenced by her Buddhist upbringing, she emphasizes equality and respect in her work, focusing on mundane moments that hold historical significance. Trained in lacquer painting, Phan now works with various materials and is inspired by fiction, history, and oral traditions. Her projects, such as those addressing the 1945 Vietnamese famine, employ moving images to convey time circularly, embracing the transformative nature of art to foster understanding and compassion.

Thao Nguyen Phan looks to the past to understand the present. Intertwining myth and reality, fact and folklore, she revives the untold stories of Vietnam's turbulent past.

“I'm interested in how history and reality are written and perceived,” she states as she sits down to unveil some of the layers of her practice.

In her delicate watercolor paintings, silk works, and installations, Phan invites audiences to reconsider how concepts like history and reality are created. By turning to forgotten oral histories and changing the perspective from which we perceive historical events, Phan seeks to challenge how conventional history is written. “Even something extremely mundane, like the life of an animal or the spirit of a tree, could have the same weight and importance as a major historical event,” she explains.

Phan's artistic approach is rooted in her upbringing in a Buddhist family, which also permeates her relationship with time. She notes, “The way I perceive time in the Asian context is more circular. Like tides going up and down.” One way in which Phan challenges Western notions of linear time is through her moving image works:

“For example, in the video piece Becoming Alluvium, I try to manifest my understanding of time through a series of reincarnations. Reincarnations in a literal way, in which the characters in the film transform and reincarnate into different lives. So basically, if I add another life, the story can be expanded to an infinite point.”

Thao Nguyen Phan (b. 1987) lives and works in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Originally trained in lacquer painting, Phan's works span multiple disciplines, including artist moving images, which she studied under American video artist Joan Jonas as a 2016-2017 Rolex Protégée. In 2019, Phan was shortlisted for the Hugo Boss Asia Art Award, and in 2018 she was granted the Han Nefkens Foundation-LOOP Barcelona Video Art Production Award, in collaboration with Fundació Joan Miró. Phan has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions worldwide, including Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan; Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen; Tate St Ives, Cornwall; and The 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, The Milk of Dreams.

Thao Nguyen Phan was interviewed by Nanna Rebekka in Phan's solo exhibition Reincarnations of Shadows at Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Thao Nguyen Phan was interviewed by Nanna Rebekka in her exhibition Reincarnations of Shadows, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Producer and editor: Nanna Rebekka
Cinematographer: Jarl Therkelsen Kaldan

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2023

Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling, and Fritz Hansen.

#Art #ArtistInterview

Subscribe to our channel for more on art: https://www.youtube.com/thelouisianachannel

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Episode 219: The Kidnapping of Carrie Lawson, Part 2

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-17 09:57:45

SUMMARY: Southern Fried True Crime covers inappropriate cases for young listeners and uses explicit language. The latest episode recaps the kidnapping of Carrie Lawson on September 11, 1991, in Jasper, Alabama. Earl and Carrie Lawson were tricked by a phony nurse caller, leading to Carrie's abduction by Jerry Bland. Bland and his accomplice, Karen McPherson, botched the ransom exchange. Despite extensive FBI efforts and searches, Carrie was never found. Bland committed suicide without revealing her location, and Karen was sentenced to life in prison. The case remains unresolved, with Carrie's family continuing to seek closure.

In the dark morning hours of September 11th 1991, in the small town of Jasper Alabama, a couple named Earl and Carrie Lawson were awoken by a fake emergency phone call that lured them out of the house. A masked man was waiting in their carport. Earl was bound with duct tape and the assailant forced Carrie into their SUV and sped off into the darkness. Carrie had been kidnapped for ransom. It seemed like something you only saw in movies. In the last episode, I told you all about the parade of mistakes the FBI made in this case. Now we're getting into the repercussions of those mistakes, and even more bad decisions…as Carrie Lawson's life hung in the balance.

Hosted and produced by Erica Kelley
Researched and written by Erica Kelley & Andrea Marshbank
Original Graphic Art by Coley Horner
Original Music by Rob Harrison of Gamma Radio
Edited and Mixed by Brandon Schexnayder & Erica Kelley
Suggested by Nocturnal Druid, Reagan Williams and Amanda

Sources: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/wellnitz-family
Website: https://southernfriedtruecrime.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/southernfriedtruecrime/
Facebook Fan Discussion: https://www.facebook.com/groups/790599034993652/
Merch: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/shop
Insta: https://www.instagram.com/southernfriedtruecrime/

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Podcasts

Episode 218: The Kidnapping of Carrie Lawson

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-13 11:11:37

SUMMARY: Southern Fraud True Crime warns listeners about explicit content. The explores cases like Carrie Lawson's kidnapping in Jasper, Alabama— a close-knit community with a population around 14,000. Carrie, from a wealthy and philanthropic family, married Earl Lawson, also from an esteemed local family, in 1990. In September 1991, the couple was deceived into leaving their home, whereupon Carrie was abducted. Despite a ransom payment and extensive FBI efforts, which included tracking, failed ransom drops, and a corrupted wire-tap, Carrie remained missing. Significant media attention and public searches ensued. The case, laden with FBI blunders, remains unresolved, turning Carrie Lawson into a symbol of Jasper's ongoing quest for justice.

In the wee hours of September 11, 1991, Earl and Carrie Lawson were awoken by an urgent phone call from a woman claiming to be a nurse who said Earl's father was hospitalized and might not make it through the night. The couple threw on clothes and rushed out the door, only to be stopped by a masked man as they were getting in their Ford Explorer. He bound Earl with duct tape, then forced 25 year-old Carrie into the Explorer and raced off into the darkness. Their families were shocked to discover this was a kidnapping for ransom. It seemed like something you only saw in movies…but it was very real and they were terrified for Carrie. 

Hosted and produced by Erica Kelley
Researched and written by Erica Kelley & Andrea Marshbank
Original Graphic Art by Coley Horner
Original Music by Rob Harrison of Gamma Radio
Edited and Mixed by Brandon Schexnayder & Erica Kelley
Suggested by Nocturnal Druid, Reagan Williams and Amanda

Sources: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/wellnitz-family
Website: https://southernfriedtruecrime.com
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/southernfriedtruecrime/
Facebook Fan Discussion: https://www.facebook.com/groups/790599034993652/
Merch: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/shop
Insta: https://www.instagram.com/southernfriedtruecrime/

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