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Chaïm Soutine: A World in Flux | Louisiana Channel

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www.youtube.com – – 2023-08-31 09:15:02

SUMMARY: When learning to paint, there are rules and techniques to follow. However, artist Chaim Soutine deviates from these rules to capture a sense of experience in his work. His paintings convey a feeling of disturbance and flux, creating an exciting viewing experience. Soutine's work breaks the mind and reveals something undeniable, stopping people in their tracks. His paintings are expressionistic and convey internal states rather than realistic depictions. Soutine's art is driven by his urgency and necessity to paint, and his unconventional approach sets him apart from other artists. His portraits and landscapes are intense, evocative, and capture the complexities of human emotion. The way he captures his subjects reveals a deep intimacy and connection. Ultimately, Soutine's paintings serve as a reminder of the power and unique experiences that art can offer.

“His paintings are not image-based at all. They are like real living things.”
– Dana Schutz, artist

Few artists leave a permanent mark on art history. One of these is Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943). Born into a poor family in a shtetl near Minsk in present-day Belarus, Soutine moved to Paris in 1913 to join the myriad of artists who lived in Paris during the nineteen-twenties. Soutine was an outsider who stood out from the crowd, going against the dominant trends toward abstraction; he painted his immediate surroundings and people who, like him, found themselves on the lowest rung of society.
Today, Soutine is known as an “artist's artist”; a prolific and influential painter whose work left an indelible mark on the world of art. Soutine's unique style and ability to capture raw emotion on canvas made him a source of inspiration for fellow artists, including the artist group CoBrA, and the School of London, who chose Soutine as a model of inspiration. Other artists who took inspiration from Soutine were Willem de Kooning (1904–1997, NL/US), Jackson Pollock (1912–1956, US), and not least Francis Bacon (1909–1992, UK).

In this , seven contemporary artists, Dana Schutz (1976, US), Amy Sillman (1955, US), Emma Talbot (1969, UK), Leidy Churchman (1979, US), Thomas Hirschhorn (1957, CH/FR), Chantal Joffe (1969, US/UK), and Imran Qureshi (1972, PK), talk about their fascination with Chaim Soutine and his work. Sitting in her studio surrounded by oil paintings, Chantal Joffe reflects on her long-time admiration for Soutine: “It's easy with painting to think ‘oh a lot of people do that,' but really there is just no one like him. There is no one who paints with that kind of specificity and yet the freedom to hold the kind of passion in check.”

Soutine's subjects include cooks, altar boys, chambermaids, and bellhops, as well as tottering landscapes and slaughtered animals. What he captures is an attitude toward life in an era marked by wars and feelings of a world in flux. His paintings reflect a vulnerability that, in many ways, speaks to the existential anxieties of our time. Painter Leidy Churchman explains: “Rembrandt had done the hanging cow at the butcher, but in this way of redemption and to say we can be saved and go to heaven. Soutine took that and was talking more about the human level of life as it is: ugly and beautiful and vibrant.”

The video is made in collaboration with Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Kunstmuseum Bern, and the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in connection with the exhibition ‘Chaïm Soutine Against the Current'. The exhibition is on view at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen in Düsseldorf until January 2024 and will be viewed at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebæk and Kunstmuseum Bern in 2024.

The seven artists were interviewed by Nanna Rebekka in their homes, galleries, and studios between April and May 2023.

Producer and editor: Nanna Rebekka
Cinematographers: Philip Peng Rosenthal, Kyle Stevenson, Sean Hanley
Curatorial consultant: Kirsten Degel
Additional photography: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2023
Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling, and Fritz Hansen.

#ChaimSoutine #Artist #Painter

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Episode 218: The Kidnapping of Carrie Lawson

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-13 11:11:37

SUMMARY: Southern Fraud True Crime warns listeners about explicit content. The explores cases like Carrie Lawson's kidnapping in Jasper, Alabama— a close-knit community with a population around 14,000. Carrie, from a wealthy and philanthropic family, married Earl Lawson, also from an esteemed local family, in 1990. In September 1991, the couple was deceived into leaving their home, whereupon Carrie was abducted. Despite a ransom payment and extensive FBI efforts, which included tracking, failed ransom drops, and a corrupted wire-tap, Carrie remained missing. Significant media attention and public searches ensued. The case, laden with FBI blunders, remains unresolved, turning Carrie Lawson into a symbol of Jasper's ongoing quest for justice.

In the wee hours of September 11, 1991, Earl and Carrie Lawson were awoken by an urgent phone call from a woman claiming to be a nurse who said Earl's father was hospitalized and might not make it through the night. The couple threw on clothes and rushed out the door, only to be stopped by a masked man as they were getting in their Ford Explorer. He bound Earl with duct tape, then forced 25 year-old Carrie into the Explorer and raced off into the darkness. Their families were shocked to discover this was a kidnapping for ransom. It seemed like something you only saw in movies…but it was very real and they were terrified for Carrie. 

Hosted and produced by Erica Kelley
Researched and written by Erica Kelley & Andrea Marshbank
Original Graphic Art by Coley Horner
Original Music by Rob Harrison of Gamma Radio
Edited and Mixed by Brandon Schexnayder & Erica Kelley
Suggested by Nocturnal Druid, Reagan Williams and Amanda

Sources: https://www.southernfriedtruecrime.com/wellnitz-family
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Writer Maria Stepanova: Advice to the Young | Louisiana Channel

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-13 09:30:22

SUMMARY: If I were to offer advice to young writers or people, I'd emphasize the lost skill of looking into the future with hope. Although it is challenging and we're often uncertain about wanting to face the future, it's beneficial to foster a desire for the unknown. This ability to anticipate and embrace what we do not yet know is crucial for the writing process. Therefore, my advice to young writers is to cultivate hope and curiosity about the future as an integral part of their creative journey.

In this short , Russian writer and journalist Maria Stepanova encourages emerging writers to focus on hope, even though it might seem difficult.

Maria Stepanova's multifaceted career spans various genres and forms, including poetry, essays, and novels. She is widely recognized for her literary and journalistic contributions that explore themes of memory, history, and identity.

When offering advice to young writers, she hesitates, because she never gives any advice. Still, she says:
“Maybe, the most important thing and he skill we have lost during the last couple of decades is an ability to look into the future with some degree of hope.”

She is not sure whether we want to get into the future, “but maybe we can ask ourselves to try wanting it” and look forward to something unknown, which, she adds, is an essential part of the writing process.

Maria Stepanova, born in 1972, is a Russian poet, essayist and journalist. She is the author of more than 10 collections of poetry. ‘War of the Beasts and Animals' came in the US in 2021 along with ‘The Voice Over' (2021), which includes a selection of Stepanova's poetry and essays originally published in Russia between 1996 and 2016. In Russia she has received many important literary prizes, including the Pasternak Prize and the Andrei Bely Prize in 2005, and the Moscow Account Prize in 2006, 2009, and 2018. Stepanova's work has been translated into English, Hebrew, Spanish, Italian, German, Finnish, French, Danish, and other languages. In 2021 ‘In Memory of Memory' was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Stepanova was appointed Siegfried-Unseld Guest Professor at Humboldt Universität in Berlin in 2018–2019. In 2007, Stepanova founded Openspace.ru, an online magazine dedicated to Russian-language arts and culture. She served as editor-in-chief of Openspace.ru until 2012, when she left the publication along with the majority of her editorial staff due to a withdrawal of funding from private investors. Stepanova disagreed with investor oversight amid the uncertain Russian political landscape; this droves her to found Colta.ru, the first Russian media outlet supported entirely by crowdfunding, providing Stepanova more editorial freedom as editor-in-chief.

Lotte Folke Kaarsholm interviewed Maria Stepanova in August 2022 in connection with the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark.

Camera: Rasmus Quistgaard
Edit: Signe Boe Pedersen
Produced by Christian Lund

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2024
Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, C.L. Davids Fond og Samling and Fritz Hansen.

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#literature #writer

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“Even Bad Art is Good” | A Visit to Ryan Gander’s Studio | Louisiana Channel

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www.youtube.com – – 2024-06-11 09:30:09

SUMMARY: An artist describes their creative space and various projects. They detail a painting of a scratched slide, an animatronic mosquito sculpture, and their process of organizing ideas using photographs and notes. The studio, once a sports center, now serves as an art haven. The artist enjoys the freedom akin to art school days. They adopt multiple fictional personas for their work, creating diverse pieces and fictional exhibitions as a form of therapy. Their studio includes a shop and hosts local school visits. Outside the building, ambiguous signage adds intrigue, and a unique resin tent sculpture creates a whimsical display.

“This studio is a bit like heaven because it's like going to art school again.”

We visited British artist Ryan Gander in his studio in Suffolk. Once a sports and leisure centre, Gander's studio is now a home for playful artistic experimentation and collections of curious objects, each with its own story.

A walk through the studio reveals a series of items, from Japanese novelty goods to tiny Christmas crackers displayed in a vending machine in alphabetical order. “That's a Japanese masturbation tool for men. And then down the bottom we've got marijuana, which is illegal in this country. You can totally get raided, although the weed seems to run out really quickly,” Gander remarks, his tone a blend of humor and candidness.

His studio walls are lined with photographs and post-it notes, each representing a nascent artwork. “People always say: You have so many ideas. I don't have any more ideas than anybody else in the world. It's just that I write them all down and stick them on the wall,” he explains. This systematic approach ensures a steady flow of creativity, transforming mundane moments into profound artistic statements.

Among the highlights of the visit is a new painting inspired by his parents' 35mm slides. “For me, this is like the perfect painting for my practice because it's basically an image. But the image again is in the viewer's head,” he notes. This painting, like much of his work, invites viewers to complete the narrative, emphasizing art's interactive and subjective nature.

Gander's reflections extend beyond his studio to broader societal concerns. He discusses the role of time in appreciating art, asserting, “Art is for the privileged. It's not about the privilege of money. It's about the privilege of time. To enjoy art, you need spare time. And spare time is the greatest privilege.”

Ryan Gander (b. in 1976, Chester, England) has established an international reputation through artworks that materialize in many forms – from sculpture to film, writing, graphic design, installation, performance, and more. Gander studied at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK, the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam, NL, and the Jan van Eyck Akademie, Maastricht, NL. Gander has been a Professor of Visual Art at the University of Huddersfield and holds an honorary Doctor of the Arts at Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Suffolk. In 2017, he was awarded an OBE for services to contemporary art. In 2019, he was awarded the Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University. In 2022, he was made RA for the category of Sculpture. As well as curating exhibitions, he is a committed educator, having taught at international art institutions and universities. He has written and edited a variety of books and presented television programs on and about contemporary art and culture for the BBC. Major projects and commissions include Kunsthalle Bern, CH; Pinault Collection, Bourse de Commerce, Paris; Space K, Seoul; Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne; Café Aubette, Strasbourg; Musée d‘art Contemporain de Montréal; Aspen Art Museum; Liverpool Biennial; Sydney Biennale; Performa, NY; High Line, NY; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; dOCUMENTA (13), Kassel; Locked Room Scenario, commissioned by Artangel, London; 54th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale; Intervals at The Guggenheim Museum, NY; Public Art Fund, NY.

Ryan Gander was interviewed by Malte Fals in June 2023. took place in Ryan Gander's studio in Woodbridge, Suffolk, United Kingdom.
Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Edited by: Malte Fals
Produced by: Malte Fals and Marc-Christoph Wagner

Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2023

Louisiana Channel is supported by Den A.P. Møllerske Støttefond, Ny Carlsbergfondet, and C.L. Davids Fond og Samling.

#artist #contemporaryart

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